TITLE VI PROJECT FOR 2000-2004 OF THE MIDWEST INSTITUTE ABSTRACT

The internationalization of the undergraduate curriculum is no longer an option or a new paradigm for higher education, but a necessity. Ten two-year colleges of the Midwest Institute Consortium are excited to form a partnership and to seek partial funding support in order to undertake a consortia effort that endeavors to build international programs, internationalize their curriculum, and provide professional development for their faculty.

The major project objectives are:


1. DESIGN AND ORGANIZE AN ACADEMIC DEGREE PROGRAM
Each college is committed to designing and organizing an academic degree program in international studies. The consortium has collected several models and plans to use an external consultant in this effort. It is important to note that under this project the presidents of the ten colleges have endorsed and support this effort.
Under this project each college coordinator and the faculty participating in the curriculum development, will work with the assigned mentors and external consultant to design a certificate and/or two-year degree in international studies. The design of each college's academic degree program will reflect its curriculum strengths, the interests of its faculty and students to be served, the courses to be internationalized, and available curriculum resources.

2. INTERNATIONALIZE EXISTING COURSES IN SEVEN TARGETED AREAS
The project is targeting the internationalization of courses that directly reach the largest number of our students in the following seven disciplinary areas: i) Foreign Languages,
ii) Business, ii) Communications-English, iv) Humanities-Art, v) Sciences-Technologies, vi) Nursing-Allied Health, and vii) Social Sciences. We have selected 65 courses to be internationalized that reflect equitably the aforementioned seven disciplinary areas.
Furthermore, the internationalization of these 90 courses will be enriched from an interdisciplinary perspective driven by the collaboration of nine cross-disciplinary faculty groupings along thematic lines, as well as exposure to a wide variety of presentations during two-week workshops in August 2000, 2001, 2002 and 2003.

3. ENABLE INDIVIDUAL COLLEGES TO BUILD INTERNATIONAL STRENGTH IN AREAS OF PROFESSIONAL EXPERTISE
The project will support 90 selected faculty from the ten two-year colleges who will research and develop a corresponding number of curriculum packets that will be incorporated into 90 identified courses. Moreover, each faculty is obligated to teach the internationalized course during the following academic year and beyond, and thus, support the programming and offering of the academic degree program of their college.
In order to facilitate the curriculum work and professional cross-fertilization of ideas, each faculty has been assigned to two professional groups and a corresponding mentor, as follows:
> a) Assigned to one of twelve thematic areas (which reflect the two-week programming of the August summer workshops of 2000, 2001, 2002, and 2003) and a mentor (with expertise on the theme) from:
i) Foreign Languages and Global Communication, ii) Health, Education, and Modernization, iii) Global Trade and Finance, vi) Cultural Diversity and Global Community, v) Global Environmental Issues and Development, vi) Arts and the Human Heritage, vii) Transnational Women Issues, viii) Cooperation and Conflict, ix) Science, Technology and Development, x) Global Conflict and Terrorism,
xi) Global Norms, Values and Governance, xii) Globalization and Capitalism.
b) Assigned to a cross-institutional disciplinary group and a mentor (expertise on internationalizing his/her discipline) from:
i) Foreign Languages (two mentors)
ii) Business
iii) Communications-English
iv) Humanities-Arts
v) Sciences-Technologies
vi) Nursing-Allied Health
vii) Social Sciences
Also, it is expected that the faculty from each college will become a "critical mass" for a professional core upon which to build an internationalized curriculum and support the academic degree program.

4. IMPROVE THE TEACHING AND OFFERINGS OF FOREIGN LANGUAGES
All three summer institutes will address foreign language pedagogy that reflects contemporary current practices that specifically incorporate the aspirations of the National Standards Project. Foreign language instruction must include not only communication skills and techniques, but also awareness and sensitivity to cultural practices and products, comparisons between target and native cultures, community links and global connections. Both foreign language faculty and non-foreign language faculty, will be exposed and encouraged to use state-of-the-art technologies and pedagogy that involve multimedia, self-directed instruction, and non-traditional assessment practices (e.g., Portfolio, Internet, and the use of "Native Groups"). The international studies degree will expand the foreign language offerings and curriculum, as a mandatory component of the degree.

5. INTEGRATE NON-WESTERN AND TRANSCULTURAL CONTENT INTO THE CURRICULUM
The programming and professional experiences under this project, especially of the three summer institutes, are significantly aimed at introducing or enhancing the expertise of the participating faculty to the non-western world. Each of the nine themes reflects a variety of non-western and transcultural issues.

6. BUILD A CROSS-INSTITUTIONAL FACULTY COMMUNICATION AND COLLABORATION NETWORK
This project provides significant opportunities for personal dialogue and exchanges of ideas (e.g., a total of six weeks of summer workshops, six teleconferences, twelve on-line Internet sessions, and campus activities) that will allow an extensive cross-institutional level of immersion and significant professional growth (as opposed to a series of short workshops/lectures).
Moreover, it is hoped that as these 90 faculty share their work and expertise with colleagues at their own college, they will serve as catalysts in attracting further interest to expand the number of internationalized courses, thus create a multiplier effect.
In order to assist with dissemination and sharing of the curriculum work, we are planning to compile and publish the 90 curriculum packets in the form of curriculum handbooks that will be shared not only within the consortium but nationwide.
In addition, we plan to make the curriculum work available through a website developed under this project.

The aforementioned six objectives will be implemented through the execution of the following major activities:


1. TWO-WEEK SUMMER WORKSHOPS IN AUGUST 2000, 2001 2002, and 2003
The two-week summer workshops will involve the selected faculty for the purpose of curriculum and professional development that will result in the creation of international curriculum packets, which will be incorporated into an equivalent number of targeted courses. The institutes have been designed to bring together outside experts, assigned facilitators/mentors with the selected faculty for the purpose of fulfilling the six objectives described above.
The four summer workshops will be thematically organized as follows:
i) Summer 2000 (August 7-18)
* Transnational Women Issues
* Cooperation and Conflict
* Science, Technology and Global Development
ii) Summer 2001 (August 6-17)
* Foreign Languages and Global Communication
* Health, Education, and Modernization
* Global Trade and Finance
iii) Summer 2002 (August 5-16)
* Cultural Diversity and Global Community
* Global Environmental Issues and Development
* Arts and the Human Heritage
iv) Summer 2003 (August 4-15)
* Global Conflict and Terrorism
* Global Norms, Values and Governance
* Globalization and Capitalism

2. CROSS-INSTITUTIONAL PROFESSIONAL GROUP ACTIVITIES
A major value-added component of a consortia project is the germination, growth and broadening which can be created from meaningful dialogue, and the sharing of resources and experiences. Beyond the summer institutes, the project is designed to provide regularly scheduled communication and networking among the seven disciplinary PGs and the nine thematic PGs, via teleconferencing and use of online conferencing via Internet. The assigned mentors will act as organizers, facilitators and resource persons during the scheduled bi-monthly electronic sessions and quarterly teleconferences. It is expected that these activities not only will support the curriculum effort but also provide cross-institutional and interdisciplinary sharing and learning. Organizing the disciplinary and thematic PGs is an integral part of this project.
Ultimately, the primary motivation of the participating colleges is to exploit and share their limited resources in supporting the internationalization of their curriculum that will provide the foundations for the establishment of an academic degree program in international studies. We believe that the anticipated benefits of this project's cumulative and multiplier effect will impact thousands of students and dozens of faculty. The consortium is designed in a cost--effective, resource-sharing, and community-building framework that reflects a well-conceived strategic alliance that incorporates both innovative and previously proven successful approaches.